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Are You Upside-Down on Your Car Loan?

First, a definition. What does the phrase “upside-down” or “underwater” actually mean when it comes to a car loan? The problem arises when the borrower owes more money on their loan than the car is actually worth. For example, if you have an accident and your car can’t be repaired, it may be worth close to nothing, but you may still have thousands of dollars left to pay your lender even after insurance pays your claim.

This scenario can happen even without a catastrophic event like an accident. Say you are moving to a new city where you don’t need a car and need to sell yours to help pay for moving expenses. Even if your car is fairly new and in excellent shape, you may not be able to sell it for enough money to pay off what you owe. New cars depreciate—or lose value—quickly, and in every case, you will still need to pay the lender back what you owe, regardless of how much it’s worth today.

Don’t forget that your car is an asset just like anything else you own, and its value is affected by market conditions. If your car is no longer as popular—perhaps because a newer model has been released or it has received some negative publicity—it will fall in value, regardless of the amount you still owe. The value might also decline faster than your loan balance declines if the car has higher mileage or is in poorer condition than average. Also, keep in mind that the portion of the loan that covers financing fees and add-ons are nearly impossible to recoup even when reselling the most desirable car out there.

Consider Refinancing

You may be tempted to get out of your loan by trading in your car for another. Your dealer can present an attractive option: rolling the amount you owe on your old car into financing for the new one. Since the dealer is in the business of selling cars, they are motivated to get your new sale and trade-in, even if it puts you even further under water by combining your debt.

You are much better off refinancing your car through a company like RefiJet, which can vet your application through its wide network of lending partners to get you the best possible deal for which you qualify. This is especially true if financial markets have changed or your personal financial situation has improved, which may help to qualify you for a lower rate or monthly payment.

When you refinance, you have the option of paying off some principle so you can get to the point where you’re no longer upside down. If you do decide to refinance, it’s a great time to consider adding GAP coverage, which pays the difference between what you owe and what the vehicle is worth in the event it is stolen or totaled.

With the help of a refinancing package and some diligent financial decisions, you can eventually put your upside-down status behind you and start on a fresh path toward better financial health. Your future self will thank you.

Refinance or Trade In Your Car?

If your car loan payments have become too difficult for you—perhaps because of a change in your income, marital status or housing situation—maybe it’s time to make some decisions. No one wants to live under constant financial strain, nor should they have to. Many choices in life are nearly impossible to undo—but not this one. So let’s take a look at your options.

First, do some digging to help define the problem by asking yourself some simple questions. Based on these answers, you can decide whether to cut bait and make a complete change or stick with your car and refinance.

  • Do I like my car?
  • What type of condition is it in?
  • Is it a reasonable car to have in my situation?
  • If my payments were more affordable, would I keep it?

Say you are a full-time employee who has decided to quit working and pursue a graduate degree. If your car is practical, gets good gas mileage and requires few repairs, and you will need a car for school, it may be a good idea to keep the car and seek refinancing to make it more affordable. A decision to refinance can often work to your advantage, especially if you have made improvements to your credit. Even if your credit is about the same, you can still benefit by stretching out your payment schedule to make your payments more affordable.

On the other hand, if your car is pricey and loaded with extras—clearly more than you need as a student with no income—it’s probably a great time to consider a trade-in. Through a trade-in, you can choose a more economical car with lower payments, and also transfer the equity you have built in your pricey car toward your new car. Both of these steps will help reduce your payments to a more affordable level.

Do Your Research

Regardless of which path you choose, you will need to do your research. If you decide to trade in your car for a lower-priced car, you’ll want to make sure that you are getting a fair deal for your trade-in. It’s a well-known fact that if you trade in your car to a dealer, you will get a lower price than if you sell it yourself to a private party. After all, the dealer is taking your trade-in with two goals in mind: to sell you a new car and sell your old trade-in, both at a profit. At the very least, you owe it to yourself to get onto a site like Kelley Blue Book (kbb.com) to learn what your trade-in is really worth, considering its age and condition, and compare it to the dealer’s offer.

If you think your current car is right for your situation moving forward, you can contact a company like RefiJet, which helps customers get a refinancing deal that is more advantageous. Since we work with so many different lenders, we can often find better loans for people who qualify. The important thing is to realize you have options—there is always another car or financing deal that better fits your circumstances.